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Redtoothed Triggerfish

Triggers

Redtoothed Triggerfish, Odonus niger

The Redtoothed Triggerfish is also known as the Niger Triggerfish, the Black Triggerfish, the Blue Triggerfish and the Purple Triggerfish.  The color varies from blue to purple to black, even on the same specimen and the teeth are reddish. It lives in reef channels and areas of strong current in the central and western Pacific and in the Red Sea.  It has a distinctive lyre tail.  Triggerfish have a double dorsal fin with a large spine or trigger in the front area of the fin. It uses the spine to lock itself into rocks and corals where it sleeps for the night, well protected from predators. 

Redtoothed Triggerfish, Odonus niger

In the wild, the Redtoothed Trigger feeds mainly on mollusks and crabs.  The Redtoothed Trigger can be fed regular live, frozen and flake foods. This can include squid, shrimp, krill, mussels, pieces of fish, starfish, sea urchins, shellfish and small fish. Their diet can be supplemented with spirulina, algae, dried seaweed and quality flake foods. Although it doesn't eat coral, it is known to damage them.  Triggerfish use their mouths to blow over invertebrates and attack them in their soft undersides. They can be very aggressive when eating.  Be careful, as they will bite hands.  The tank should be a minimum of 75 - 100 gallons.  It should have plenty of places to hide plus open areas for swimming.

Redtoothed Triggers are very resistant to disease.  There are no known sexual differences.  Redtoothed Triggers are egg layers and they are not bred in captivity.

Redtoothed Triggerfish, Odonus niger Redtoothed Triggerfish, Odonus niger

Scientific Name: Odonus niger
Family: Balistidae
Care: Normal
Temperature: 22 - 26 C; 72 - 78 F
pH: 8.1 - 8.4
dH: 8 - 12
Specific Gravity: 1.020 - 1.025
Size: 50 cm; 20 inches
Breeding: Egg Layer
Life Span: 10 years
Crustacean Safe: No
Coral Safe: No
 

Compatibility:

Only one Triggerfish per tank unless they have grown up together.  Keep with large basses, groupers, large surgeonfish, aggressive eels, lionfish and puffers.  Do not keep with invertebrates, blennies, cardinalfish or species that are smaller than the trigger.